<!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"><div class=Section1><span style='font-size:18.0pt'>History 2340</span>
<span style='font-size:18.0pt'>Leadership LLeadership and Virtue in American History (HONORS)
<span style='font-size:18.0pt'> Spring 2009</span>

Instructor:  Dr. Robert F. Pace
Office Hours: MW 2:30-3:30; TR10:00-11:30 OR BY APPOINTMENT
Office:  Old Main 205
Office Phone: 793-3865
e-mail: rpace@mcm.edu

 


Course Description:

This course will satisfy the LEV elective of the General Education.  Using comparative study techniques, this course will examine basic ideas of leadership and virtue as demonstrated in the lives and ideas of major figures in American history. The course will engage students to explore the question of how virtue informs effective leadership, using concrete historical case studies. No Prerequisites.

 


Course Rationale:

In 1825 David Crockett first ran for Congress on the motto, “Be sure you are right, then go ahead.”  American leaders who both preceded and followed Crockett, have all faced ethical dilemmas of providing practical leadership in a world where right and wrong is not clearly defined.  Using techniques embraced by John F. Kennedy in Profiles in Courage, this course will explore ideas of leadership and virtue as demonstrated by a variety of individuals throughout United States history. The course will provide a breadth of historical background and knowledge but will also look at these figures through the lens of cultural, religious, political, and economic perspectives. The specific figures studied may change each semester, but the overriding principles of the nature of leadership and civic virtue will be the main themes for the course.  Using these historical case studies, students will be required to compare historical examples of leadership and virtue in their personal lives. This course will focus specifically on the varieties of leadership in American history. <div class=MsoNormal align=center style='text-align:center'>

 


Required Texts:

·         De Officiis by Marcus Tullius Cicero (Translated by Walter Miller, Loeb edn. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1913) , which can be found at http://www.constitution.org/rom/de_officiis.htm

 


Course Objectives:

·         To understand historical, cultural and personal elements of leadership.

·         To demonstrate understanding of leadership in personal contexts.

·         To explore historical, cultural and practical elements of virtue.

·         To demonstrate understanding of virtuous behavior in personal contexts.<div class=MsoNormal align=center style='text-align:center'>

 


</div>Course Schedule:

Week 1 (January 12-16): Beginnings
Assignment: Read De Officiis by Marcus Tullius Cicero (Translated by Walter Miller, Loeb edn. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1913) , which can be found at http://www.constitution.org/rom/de_officiis.htm .

Week 2 (January 19-23): Defining Virtue
Assignment: Read De Officiis

Week 3 (January 26-30): Defining Virtue
Assignment: Participate in Moodle discussion over De Officiis and Definitions of Virtue on Moodle.
Monday, (1/30): Virtue Definitions Exam

<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">Week 4 (February 2-6): Time and Place: Colonial America and Early Republic
Assignment: Begin reading biographies

</span><span lang=FR style='mso-ansi-language:FR'><o:p></o:p></span>Week 5 (February 9-13): Time and Place: Colonial America and Early Republic
Assignment:

Week 6 (February 16-20): Time and Place: Colonial America and Early Republic

Assignment:

Week 7 (February 23-27): Profiles in Virtue—Colonial America and Early Republic
Assignment: Present biographical exemplars of virtue                                                                      

<span style="mso-spacerun: yes"></span>Week 8 (March 2-6): Profiles in Virtue—Colonial America and Early Republic
Assignment: Present biographical exemplars of virtue

SPRING BREAK (March 9-13)

Week 9 (March 16-20): Time and Place: Civil War, Reconstruction, and Modern America
Assignment: .

Week 10 (March 23-27): Time and Place: Civil War, Reconstruction, and Modern America
Assignment:

Week 11 (March 30-April 3): Time and Place: Civil War, Reconstruction, and Modern America
Assignment:

Week 12 (April 6-10): Time and Place: Civil War, Reconstruction, and Modern America
Assignment:
FRIDAY (4/10): Easter Break<![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]><![endif]>

Week 13 (April 13-17): Profiles in Virtue—Civil War, Reconstruction, and Modern America
Assignment: Present biographical exemplars of virtue
MONDAY (4/13): Easter Break

Week 14 (April 20-24):  Profiles in Virtue—Civil War, Reconstruction, and Modern America
Assignment: Present biographical exemplars of virtue

Week 15 (April 27-May 1): Profiles in Virtue—Modern America

Assignment:

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Course Requirements:

  • Virtue Definitions Exam: Due by September 15
  • Participation in five online discussions: See schedule
  • Complete four online comprehension quizzes: See schedule
  • Final Examination

***Note that these assignments are required as part of your passing this class.  Failure to complete any of these assignments will result in automatic failure, regardless of your overall average.

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Grading:

Your final grade in the course will be determined as follows:
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Attendance/Participation

100 points

Virtue Def. Exam 

100 points 

Moodle Discussions

250 points

Comprehension Quizzes

400 points 

Final Exam

150 points

 

The following grading scale will be observed for the semester: 

930-1000

 A <span style="mso-spacerun: yes">

 

730-779

 C

900-929

 A-

 

700-729

 C-

880-899

 B+

 

680-699

 D+

830-879

 B

 

630-679

 D

800-829

 B-

 

600-629

 D-

780-799

 C+

 

 

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Attendance Policy:

Attendance in the class is REQUIRED.  Because much of the information in this class comes from lectures, absences will place the student significantly behind, therefore, attendance records will be kept.  If a student arrives after roll is taken, it is the student's responsibility to make sure his or her presence has been recorded AT THE END OF THAT DAY'S CLASS.  Only official University absences are recognized as excused. Unexcused students missing tests can not take a make-up.  If a student has more than two (2) unexcused absences, he or she will receive a "0" on the attendance/participation grade.  IT IS THE STUDENT'S RESPONSIBILITY TO KEEP TRACK OF ALL DOCUMENTATION OF EXCUSED ABSENCES AND TO BE ABLE TO PRODUCE THEM FOR THE INSTRUCTOR UPON REQUEST. STUDENTS WHO MISS CLASS FOR A UNIVERSITY-SANCTIONED ATHLETIC OR ACADEMIC EVENT SHOULD INFORM THE INSTRUCTOR IN ADVANCE OF EACH CLASS THE STUDENT WILL MISS. THE STUDENT SHOULD FOLLOW UP WITH THE INSTRUCTOR THE CLASS PERIOD FOLLOWING THE ABSENCE TO MAKE SURE THAT THE ABSENCE HAS BEEN RECORDED AS EXCUSED. E-MAILS TO THE INSTRUCTOR FROM THE VPAA’S OFFICE DO NOT CONSTITUTE INFORMING THE INSTRUCTOR—THEY ARE MERELY CONFIRMATION OF INFORMATION THE STUDENT IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CONVEYING.<![if !supportEmptyParas]> <![endif]><o:p></o:p>

Unexcused absences on student presentation days will also result in a lowering of the student’s participation grade.<span style='color:windowtext'><o:p></o:p></span><![if !supportEmptyParas]> <![endif]><o:p></o:p><div class=MsoNormal align=center style='text-align:center'>

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Make-up Policy

Make-up exams will be administered only when students can show a valid reason for their absence (this means confirmation from either a doctor or from the dean).  Students must schedule the make-up exam with the instructor within one week of the original exam.  Failure to make such arrangements will result in failure of the course.

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Comprehension Quizzes:

At four times during the semester, students will be required to complete a timed, online quiz over material from the readings and from the lectures. These quizzes will be posted on Moodle, and all students must complete them by the deadline. Once the deadline arrives, the quiz will no longer be available.

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Moodle discussions:

All students will participate in online discussions over readings and information presented in class. The instructor will post a variety of questions and prompts on Moodle related to the topic of the week. At five times during the semester, students will be required to post their responses and insights related to the material. Student responses will be graded according to the depth, comprehension, and sophistication of responses. Good student responses might be either in answer to a question posted by the instructor, or as a follow-up to another students’ response.

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Note on Disabilities:

McMurry University abides by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which stipulates that no otherwise qualified student shall be denied the benefits of an education "solely by reason of a handicap". If you have a documented disability that may impact your performance in this class and for which you may require accommodations, you must be registered with and provide documentation of your disability to the Disability Services Office, located in Old Main, Room 102. Their phone number is 793-4880. Feel free to contact the instructor with any questions related to disabilities.<div class=MsoNormal align=center style='text-align:center'>

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<span style='color:black'>Academic Honesty</span>

All work for this class is to be the student's own work. Plagiarism will not be accepted, and cheating will not be tolerated. Students should work on their own research for papers, even though other students will have the same topic. Students may work together to plan the presentations, once the papers have been turned in. Evidence of cheating on these projects will result in failure of the class. Additionally, cheating on exams, through use of crib notes or any other means, will result in failure of the class.

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Course Objectives/Student Learning Outcomes

and their Linkage to

Program and University Goals and Outcomes.

 

Course Number and Title

History 2340</span>
<span style='font-size:18.0pt'>Leadership and Virtue in American HistoryLea Leadership and Virtue in American History
<span style='font-size:18.0pt'> Spring 2008</span>

 

Desired Student Learning Outcomes for this course

Linked to which departmental program goal(s)

Linked to which institutional goal(s)?

Types of evidence that might be used to demonstrate student achievement of objectives & goals

To understand historical, cultural and personal elements of leadership.

Possess general knowledge of American and World History, with emphasis on skills for historical research and interpretation.

Possess requisite knowledge and skills to teach history at the elementary and secondary levels, or possess requisite knowledge and skills to begin work in post-secondary levels education or related fields.

2, 3, 6

At the beginning of the course students will be presented with a list of historical leaders and recognizable virtues (primarily for reference purposes).  For each historical personality offered, they will be required to write 1-2 paragraphs discussing which virtues are best illustrated throughout the respective individual’s life.  At the conclusion of the course, students will be presented with the same assignment, so that an increased understanding of historical, cultural, and/or practical elements of leadership and virtue can be measured.

To demonstrate understanding of leadership in personal contexts.

Possess general knowledge of American and World History, with emphasis on skills for historical research and interpretation.

Possess requisite knowledge and skills to teach history at the elementary and secondary levels, or possess requisite knowledge and skills to begin work in post-secondary levels education or related fields.

2, 3, 6

In a written exercise, students will be required to analyze leadership and virtuous behavior in personal context.    Each student will be required to compare his/her personality, life, and career goals to one of the historical leaders studied in the course and demonstrate how that individual’s actions and behavior can serve as a model for that student’s life.

 

To explore historical, cultural and practical elements of virtue.

Possess general knowledge of American and World History, with emphasis on skills for historical research and interpretation.

Possess requisite knowledge and skills to teach history at the elementary and secondary levels, or possess requisite knowledge and skills to begin work in post-secondary levels education or related fields.

2, 3, 6

At the beginning of the course students will be presented with a list of historical leaders and recognizable virtues (primarily for reference purposes).  For each historical personality offered, they will be required to write 1-2 paragraphs discussing which virtues are best illustrated throughout the respective individual’s life.  At the conclusion of the course, students will be presented with the same assignment, so that an increased understanding of historical, cultural, and/or practical elements of leadership and virtue can be measured.

To demonstrate understanding of virtuous behavior in personal contexts.

Possess requisite knowledge and skills to teach history at the elementary and secondary levels, or possess requisite knowledge and skills to begin work in post-secondary levels education or related fields.

 

In a written exercise, students will be required to analyze leadership and virtuous behavior in personal context.    Each student will be required to compare his/her personality, life, and career goals to one of the historical leaders studied in the course and demonstrate how that individual’s actions and behavior can serve as a model for that student’s life.

 


Education (aligned with Core Values 1 & 3)

2. Students are equipped for successful careers and post-graduate education.

3. Students acquire an enthusiasm for lifelong learning through expanded intellectual and cultural experiences.

Development (aligned with Core Values 1, 2, 3, & 5)

6. In a community where spiritual, emotional, moral, intellectual, and physical qualities are nurtured, students will grow as whole persons. 

 

 McMurry University's Core Values (as referenced above)

  1. Christian Faith as the foundation of life,
  2. Personal Relationships as the catalyst for life,
  3. Learning as the journey of life,
  4. Excellence as the goal of life, and
  5. Service as the measure of life.